Flunking school is flunking life?

A lot of the people I admire didn’t do well at school. Some of them even dropped out. Not because they weren’t smart enough, but because they couldn’t live up to the standards of the system they were in.

They didn’t like school because school didn’t like them.

Yet that doesn’t have to mean society won’t like them either which is actually what a lot of schools, parents and politicians want us to think.

That’s so wrong.

There’s always more to life than school.

That’s the most important lesson in education.

That will actually keep more kids in school.

Not the reprimands, not the punishments, but a profound sense of understanding of what you’re telling these kids about this world, a profound sense of what you’re learning these kids about life.

And that goes way beyond the technicalities of your subject, beyond tests and grades and diplomas.

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2 thoughts on “Flunking school is flunking life?

  1. Flunked out says:

    Children are taught in a way that reaches only the common child. Our schools are full of uncommon children. Some are brilliant. Others have the same capacity, if you can figure out how to teach them in a way they understand.

    These kids don’t need to be flunking school. They need to be engaged!

  2. Hannes says:

    Brian Greene wrote a terrific piece about this in the NY Times. Greene talks about science-education in particular. A lot of science teachers still stick too much to the technical details of science. They don’t manage to show what science means to the world.

    “But most of these studies (and their suggestions) avoid an overarching systemic issue: in teaching our students, we continually fail to activate rich opportunities for revealing the breathtaking vistas opened up by science, and instead focus on the need to gain competency with science’s underlying technical details.”

    Read all about this here

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/opinion/01greene.html?_r=1&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=all&oref=slogin

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